I took a break from the wet weather in South England, in order to enjoy the wet weather in Edinburgh, and attend the WebSphere user group. For one thing; our Alan Philpott was also going up there to hold a presentation on applying best practice in terms of SDLC to Datapower devices. Also Bharat Bhushan would be presenting on trouble-shooting and performance tuning of the devices. I have the latter’s slides for any of our DP rangers who want a walk-though. I will post a pdf of them up on sharepoint.

The WUG had a bit of a wobble last year, when some of the committee (who do their work for ‘free’) found that they no longer had the spare capacity to put in. The committee are still looking for volunteers. Some people questioned whether the WUG would continue to be viable. From the attendance levels of this recent meeting, the degree of organisation, and the quality of the  presentations, you would not notice any issues.

There was an interesting set of presentations (full details here), but the stuff that caught my eye was the OSGi stream. The OSGi framework (the dynamic framework system for java) has been around for a few years, not least as the underpinning technology behind Eclipse, since version 3. There is a good definition of it on wikipedia. I have seen it before in a container used to host the enterprise service mix ESB (a.k.a. FUSE 4). Adrian Treneman gives a good run-through here.

What has been interesting has been seeing this technology hitting the mainstream (IBM), and being taken seriously there. I attended two presentations, one of which covered the tooling support in Rational Application Developer (RAD) 8, and another covering the support for OSGi in WAS 8. It was previously available as a feature pack for WAS 7.0. The interesting part here was to see that the technology was being incorporated for simple pragmatic reasons (ability to load different versions of libraries into the same JVM – to be used by different applications, lowering memory footprint by sharing libraries amongst several applications) – rather than as some new-age magic.

I have grossly over-simplified in the above, but it may be a prompter for anyone who is interested to follow it up.

The other major new thing for me was WebSphere eXtreme Scale (WXS). On first seeing the title of the presentation, I thought that it would be a re-branding of either WAS ND or WAS XD. Wrong! “It’s just a cache”, as Jonathan Marshall announced at the beginning of his presentation – hugely underselling the use of caching technologies, and the product itself – before going on to show those benefits in his talk. Having recently been involved in two use-cases for caching technologies (dynamic content management) and web-session management in hugely scaling environments: both situations where databases struggle, and application server session-sharing mechanisms struggle (the old n^2 communication overhead, as the number of app. servers increases)… I could appreciate the problems that WXS product is trying to solve.

WXS is not the only player in this space. As well as other commercial offerings (which I had previously heard issues about) there are several open source alternatives (e.g. memcached), but since the general area is very new… not all of the products implement all of the features (e.g. active standby). Indeed there is probably not a common consensus of what all the features are. I will distribute slides on the internal sharepoint site. They should become available on the WUG site in due course. The take-away news for me is that IBM have a seemingly very capable product in this area, now, which merits investigation in some of my existing scenarios, and also new scenarios such as using the cache as a system of record.

So even after a few years of going along to the WUG, it still has the ability to make me sit up and take notice! Long live the…